Choose your URL

Choose your privacy centre domain

Choose the domain name prefix you want your privacy centre to be found on. This will be hosted as “name”.port.im on PORT’s servers to provide you simple and instant use of the privacy centre.

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Using your own domain for your privacy centre

Using your own domain name is simple, select yes and follow the steps.

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Prerequisites for Importing Certificates

Your certificate must satisfy the following criteria:

  • The certificate must specify a cryptographic algorithm and a key size. The following algorithms are supported:
    • 1024-bit RSA (RSA_1024)
    • 2048-bit RSA (RSA_2048)
  • The certificate must be an SSL/TLS X.509 version 3 certificate. It must contain a public key, the fully qualified domain name for your website, and information about the issuer. If your certificate is signed by a CA, you must include the certificate chain when you import your certificate.
  • The certificate must be valid at the time of import. You cannot import a certificate before its validity period begins or after it expires. The NotBefore certificate field contains the validity start date, and the NotAfter field contains the end date.
  • The private key must be unencrypted. You cannot import a private key that is protected by a password or passphrase.
  • The cryptographic algorithm of an imported certificate must match the algorithm of the signing CA. For example, if the signing CA key type is RSA, then the certificate key type must also be RSA.
  • The certificate, private key, and certificate chain must be PEM–encoded. For more information and examples, see beloew.

The following examples illustrate the format of the files to be imported. If the components come to you in a single file, use a text editor (carefully) to separate them into three files. Note that if you edit any of the characters in a PEM file incorrectly or if you add one or more spaces to the end of any line, the certificate, certificate chain, or private key will be invalid.

Example 1. PEM–encoded certificate

-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----

Base64–encoded certificate

-----END CERTIFICATE-----

Example 2. PEM–encoded certificate chain

A certificate chain contains one or more certificates. You can use a text editor, the copy command in Windows, or the Linux cat command to concatenate your certificate files into a chain. The certificates must be concatenated in order so that each directly certifies the one preceding. If importing a private certificate, copy the root certificate last. The following example contains three certificates, but your certificate chain might contain more or fewer.

Important: Do not copy your certificate into the certificate chain.

-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----

Base64–encoded certificate

-----END CERTIFICATE-----

-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----

Base64–encoded certificate

-----END CERTIFICATE-----

-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----

Base64–encoded certificate

-----END CERTIFICATE-----

Example 3. PEM–encoded private keys

X.509 version 3 certificates utiliae public key algorithms. When you create an X.509 certificate or certificate request, you specify the algorithm and the key bit size that must be used to create the private–public key pair. The public key is placed in the certificate or request. You must keep the associated private key secret. Specify the private key when you import the certificate. The key must be unencrypted. The following example shows an RSA private key.

-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----

Base64–encoded private key

-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----